Family Law Blog

Spouse is Employed, But No Spousal Support is Being Paid

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

After a divorce, spousal support is put in place to help you restart your life. However, while there are exceptions made for spouses that lost their jobs for reasons beyond their control, if your spouse is employed, they should be paying. Perhaps you gave them a little leeway in terms of payment, but what do you do after a few reminders haven't manifested in payment?

 If spousal support payment is not being made, your only most effective option is to return to court, but even then receiving payment is not a guarantee. While your spouse may be employed, sometimes the court will state that they do not have the funds to adhere to their spousal support payment, particularly if there is a substantial amount past due. However, a judge may initiate any of the following to see that payment is followed through.

  • Wage garnishment
  • Offsets of tax returns
  • Garnishment of retirement accounts
  • Spousal support reduced to a money judgment
  • Suspension of passport, driver's license, or professional license until payment is made

If your ex-spouse has the funds in order to be paying their spousal support, all of the above will be used by the court to make sure they pay you what is due. If they have been consciously withholding payment while also having the means to pay it, you may also receive past due payments to help make you whole.

If you are getting divorced or have an ex-spouse that is not making spousal support payments on time, contact us today. Let the Law Firm of Jamra & Jamra help make sure you get the spousal support that you need so you can get back on your feet after a divorce.


Challenges of Early Life Divorces

Friday, January 12, 2018

You know what they say, your younger years are for making mistakes. However, for most people, those mistakes don't include a bad marriage, or rather, they don't realize it is a mistake until much later. However, if you get married young and realize it was a mistake, getting a divorce in your 20's can provide some unique challenges.

One of the most unique challenges you will face is the social stigma. Friends and family will likely have the "I told you so" of it all ready to go once the filing has begun. For many, this may pressure them into staying in an unhappy marriage because they don't want deal with the negativity. However, one of the benefits of realizing a marriage is not working while you are young is that you have plenty of time to start over. Don't let it ruin you for other relationships, but rather use it to know what you want out of your next one.

Furthermore, another unique challenge you face through an early divorce is the financial strain of the process. You may not have to deal with stock portfolios or retirement accounts quite yet, but many young divorcing couples find the divorce process more expensive than they can afford. This means it might be difficult to come up with funding for the legal process, but typically in early divorces, there is not much in the way of asset division. Neither you or your spouse have become accustomed to a lavish way of living because the wages in your early years are somewhat low. Typically this means asset division is easier, but you should both plan for post-marriage life before divorcing. Money may be tight and you should both allow yourself enough time to make arrangements.

While early divorces are stressful and expensive (though not more or less expensive than if you were married 10+ years), you still should not be afraid to go through with it. You deserve to be in a marriage where you are happy. If you are young and considering a divorce, contact us today.

What Happens When A Child Doesn’t Want to Have Visitation?

Tuesday, January 02, 2018

Often when it comes to visitation issues, typically it is one parent not showing up to a scheduled visitation, resulting in understandable heartbreak. However, occasionally it can actually be the child that doesn't want to attend a visitation. Maybe they are bored just watching TV with dad all day, or maybe mom is seeing someone new and it is resulting in some discomfort on their part. Regardless of the reason, what happens when a child no longer wants to attend visitation?

If the custodial parent denies visitation, they can be held in contempt of court. This can still happen if your child is refusing. This is why the custodial parent needs to take steps in order to remedy their relationship with the non-custodial parent.

The incontrovertible first step should always be to ask your child why they don't want to go. Sometimes it can be from neglect or abuse, and then that becomes a whole different ball game where you can often have visitation revoked. However, if it is something like boredom and negative emotions, often you can ask your ex-spouse to address these issues. Perhaps it would be better to spend time with their child doing more interesting things or it would be better if their new significant other wasn't around until they were more comfortable. You, as the custodial parent, need to explain very clearly how spending time with both parents is important. Make sure it is known that both sides love them and both sides always want to spend time with them.

If your child still refuses, a last resort may also be asking your ex-spouse for a little break from visitation. However, this might open you up to legal action. This means that if your child is refusing visitation, you may want to contact us to talk your options over with a lawyer.

What Happens if One Party Doesn’t Show Up to a Divorce Hearing?

Saturday, December 30, 2017

Divorce is a very contentious time in the lives of divorcing couples. Emotions run hot and a lot of arguments can come up. It often gets to the point where bitterness can take over and one part of a dissolving marriage doesn't want to see the other's face ever again. They think that maybe they can trip things up a little by not showing up to a court date. However, not going to court when ordered to appear is perhaps one of the worst things you can do.

If you or your spouse fail to show up for your scheduled divorce hearing, then it is effectively wasting the court's time, and they are not pleased about it. If no good reason is given, the judge will hold the absent party in contempt of court, authorize a bench warrant for their arrest, and you will likely have to pay a fine for it. Furthermore, skipping a court date in a divorce only works in favor of the party that was present. It could cause a biased in their favor when it comes to the terms of the divorce.

That being said, sometimes one party just wants things to be over without going to court. If you agree to the terms of the divorce, but don't want to sit in court, either party can file for an uncontested divorce. In this, only the filing spouse needs to attend court. However, before this can happen, the separation agreement needs to have agreed upon terms by both parties in regards to spousal support, child support, debt repayment, and property division.

If you are filing for divorce and believe your spouse may be non-compliant to showing up to court or agreeing to an uncontested divorce, contact us today. The good news is that is your spouse is being difficult, the divorce will still progress after filing whether they like it or not. Furthermore, it may even come out more in your favor.

What Happens to the Family Home in a Divorce?

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

You made a lot of good memories in your home, and even if your marriage started to sour, those memories may be something you want to hang on to. However, the messiest part of divorce is dividing up the stuff, and the family home is part of that stuff.

If you want to keep the property, your best course of action is to come to some agreement on it. When it comes to property division, real estate isn't physically divided by the courts, but rather it must be sold off and the monetary value is then split between the divorced couple. This means you lose the house and all those memories are now just solely in your mind.

However, there are some cases in which one party may retain ownership without having to make a compromise. The most common situation for this is if the home was bought before the marriage. If you bought the home before the marriage and your name remained the sole name on it, then it will most often be awarded back to you. However, even if you added your ex-spouse's name on to the house, it may still be argued that since you bought the property before the marriage that it is still yours.

Unfortunately, most married couples buy their first home together. This means that no matter how much you cherish those memories, your property will still need to be divided. If you still want to retain it, you will need to work extensively to compromise with your ex-spouse. If you are divorcing and desperately want to keep your family home, contact us today! 

Utilize Technology to Facilitate Co-Parenting

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Communication! When you cannot communicate with your child's other parent, it can make everyone's life miserable, especially if the other parent is trying to make it difficult! 

The Game: do these false accusations and lies sound familiar?

  • I didn't get the message!
  • You never sent me _____!
  • My phone was off!
  • My battery died!
  • I sent you the money last week!

Well, good news! Technology can help! Stop stressing out about petty lies and accusations so you can focus on your child!

Here are two companies that offer software that can help: 2houses and Our Family Wizard. Both offer you the ability to communicate solely through their program, which eliminates a lot of miscommunication and false claims! Both programs feature financial tracking options that allow you to upload relevant receipts. The programs can calculate how much each party should pay and you can pay through the portal! The calendars are easy to use so that both of you can add events or request a change in the schedule! Our Family Wizard's messaging system detects aggressive tones and makes suggestions to keep communication civil. Both programs are available on desktop and phone apps for easier access! 2houses offers a free 14-day trial and monthly payment options while Our Family Wizard offers a 30-day money back guarantee, military discounts and scholarship opportunities. 

If you are in a high-conflict situation and the other parent is damaging your child's emotional well-being, contact us! We can help you develop a parenting plan that will protect your child!  


If Divorce is on Your Mind

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Are you contemplating divorce? The legal process is complicated and can involve working with your spouse as much as possible to avoid unnecessary conflict, or it could mean a long drawn-out court battle. The important thing to remember is that no two divorces will be precisely the same, as different factors will come into play. 

The First Step

You will either be on the receiving end of a divorce petition, or you will be in the position of serving it to your former partner. You should consider where to file for divorce. Usually, the next step entails you filing papers in the state or county where you or your spouse lives. Also, make sure to familiarize yourself with your state or county's residency requirements so that you are filing in the correct location. If your partner serves in the military, you have the option to file papers where your partner is stationed. 

Will You File for a "No Fault" Divorce?

Choosing between a "fault" and a "no fault" divorce is an important part of the filing process. "Fault" divorces encompass the negative aspects of a marriage such as abuse or adultery. If children aren't in the picture or assets are at a minimum, getting a "summary" divorce is a possibility. Seeking the advice of a lawyer would be wise here, as you don't want to inadvertently surrender your property or child support rights. 

Mediation is Important 

Divorce doesn't need to be synonymous with bitter conflict. Mediation is a very valid option when it comes to resolving the finer points of separation, and can save you quite a bit of time and money. Mediation experts, while not perfect, are experienced in hammering out solutions to points of contention between you and your spouse. This process should be considered among the first steps to take after filing for divorce rather than a last resort.   

If you are contemplating divorce, contact us for more information. 

Informing A Child About The Decision To Divorce

Thursday, October 12, 2017

If you have a child, and you and your spouse have decided to get a Divorce, it is likely you are pondering the best way to go about informing your offspring about the changes they are about to endure. Letting a child know that their parents are about to go separate ways can be a bit challenging, and extremely heart-breaking. Here are some points to keep in mind when starting the divorce process.

Be Sure To Let Your Child Know The Reasoning

Without getting into specifics, let your child know why you are deciding to get a divorce. Alerting them that you do not get along with your spouse as much as you did in the past or that you both believe you will be happier apart may not make your child feel better, but they will realize the truth in these words may lead to you having less stress and an overall positive outlook in the future. Let your child know they are in no way responsible for the divorce. Hearing this from their parents is important.

Work Out A Plan For Visitation If Possible

Do your best to work with your soon to be ex-spouse regarding the time each of you spend with your child. A sit-down discussion one-on-one about their well-being can be enough to get both parties to realize that your child should not be used as a pawn or for negotiating purposes. Their lifestyle and what is to happen soon should be foremost on your mind, as well as your spouse's. Keep their interests in mind with any decision you make throughout the divorce process.

Keep Things As Close To Normal As Possible

It is a good idea to stick with the same routines as much as you can. Incorporate visitation time with the other party into the schedule, making sure your child is well aware of the dates and times they will be seeing your spouse. Do not speak poorly about your spouse to your child, no matter how angry you are. This will help to keep your child from feeling as if they have to pick sides, leading to possible depression as a result.

The divorce process is extremely difficult. Pick up the phone and contact us to find out more about child custody, visitation rights, in addition to property and asset distribution today.


Social Security and Divorce: What Happens To The Benefits When You Split?

Friday, October 06, 2017

Social security is meant to help support you when you reach retirement age, and if you get married then you and your spouse's social security benefits are entwined. But what happens if you get divorced? Well, it really depends on how long you were married as the Social Security Agency points out.

10 Years is The Sweet Spot

If you were married for ten years, or longer, then it is possible to receive benefits based on your spouse's income. As long as you:

- Are 62 years of age (or older)

- Have not remarried

- Your ex-spouse is entitled to receive either retirement or disability benefits, and those benefits are greater than what you would receive for your own retirement or disability

If you meet the above qualifications, then you could be entitled to one-half of your ex-partner's social security benefits. Additionally, if you have remarried but you divorce, your marriage is annulled, or your partner dies before you reach the ten-year mark, then you could become eligible for benefits under your former partner's social security once again.

It's also important to remember that your ex-partner doesn't necessarily need to be receiving social security in order for you to claim your portion of it. If your ex-partner qualifies for social security (whether or not they're currently receiving any benefits), and you have been divorced for at least two years, then you can start receiving your benefits as soon as you qualify for them.

Divorce complicated social security, but the system can be navigated with relative ease if you pick up the phone, and contact the agency in question. They're typically more than happy to answer your questions, and walk you through the process until you're comfortable with how it works.

For more information on divorce, division of property, and how you can move on with your life after your split, simply contact us today!

Reasons to Choose Annulment Over Divorce

Thursday, September 28, 2017


It happens every day. Couples come to the decision that they no longer want to be together. If they were dating, the split is heart-breaking but simple. However, if they are legally married, splitting up is just ever so much more difficult. When it comes to dissolving a marriage, there are two choices: divorce or annulment.

Contrary to the belief, annulments aren't just for quickie weddings in Las Vegas, they can be employed for a number of reasons. Unlike divorce, an annulment can only happen if there are specific situations about the marriage. In most states, these include reasons of fraud, bigamy, underage or incompetent spouse, or the marriage has not been consummated.

Typically the difference between an annulment and a divorce is that an annulment makes it as if the marriage never happened, but a divorce will always be on record. In days past when divorce had a negative stigma, seeking an annulment was the preferred course of action. However, today most people seek annulments in order to protect their property and possessions. If you can prove that a spouse was already married or lied about who they were, then a marriage can be annulled and even in an equal division of property states, they will have no claim on what is yours.

Annulments may be the preferable option for some, but if you do not fit the strict requirements, then you will have to settle for a regular old divorce. However, that doesn't mean you have to lose everything. With the right divorce lawyer, you can make sure your divorce goes smoothly and in your favor. If you are considering a separation, contact us today.