Family Law Blog

What Happens if Your Spouse Doesn't Show Up For A Divorce Hearing?

Thursday, June 08, 2017

You have filed for a divorce and the day of the hearing has come. You are sitting in court, in front of a judge, and you wait. Your spouse hasn't shown up, and they don't show up. What then? Fear, guilt, apathy, depression, or spite may be keeping them away, but skipping court is never a good idea.

The justice system never likes to have their time wasted, and if your spouse doesn't show up for your divorce hearing, bad things will happen. If they failed to notify the court, the can be charged with contempt, and the judge can even issue a bench warrant for their arrest as well as a fine.

However, there are cases where the spouse agrees to the divorce but doesn't want to make a court appearance. This qualifies as uncontested divorce. In these cases, both parties must agree to the division of property, debts, child custody and spousal support. In doing so, the non-filing spouse won't be required to show up to the court hearing.

However, if both parties cannot agree, they are both required to appear in court. By not doing so, not only can the aforementioned bench warrant and fine be issued, but the courts are more likely to show favor to the party that did show up for their court appearance.

If you are filing for divorce and want to know if you need to show up to the hearing or feel your spouse might not show up, contact us today. As divorce lawyers, Jamra & Jamra are dedicated to providing the best legal representation and getting the outcome you desire.

What To Do When Your Ex Is Alienating You From Your Child

Thursday, January 12, 2017

After undergoing a divorce, you may find that your ex-spouse is alienating the child from you. When they are preventing the child from meeting you, it is simply known as parent alienation. The case becomes more complex, however, when the other parent is having a damaging psychological effect on your child’s relationship with you.

The other parent may be denigrating you in front of your child or telling them that you do not love them. When the child develops negative feelings towards you, it is called Parent Alienation Syndrome, which was researched by Richard Gardner some decades ago.

The problem over here is to get the court to recognize what is going on. Parent Alienation Syndrome is not a medically recognized syndrome. Of course, if the court determines that the other parent is undermining your relationship with your child, they will probably step in and attempt to remedy the situation by setting up therapy sessions for the child or even by giving you child custody (in severe situations). The court is looking out for your child's best interests, which is to have a healthy relationship with both parents. 

However, before the court will take action, they will usually order a third-party psychological evaluation for the child. This can take time, and before you know it, the case can drag on for a year, with the alienation only getting worse.

The key to winning over here is to get the court to take action quickly, without dragging their feet. That’s why you need a lawyer who is knowledgeable in child support and alienation matters. For legal help, and to save your relationship with your child, make sure to contact us.

Can Social Media Impact Your Divorce? The Answer Is Yes

Thursday, December 29, 2016

We are living in the days where almost everyone has signed up for a social media account. While using social media can certainly be fun and entertaining, you have to be careful about the type of things you post to those social media websites. 

The information you post can be seen by a significant amount of people. If you are going through a divorce, you need to be very cautious about the type of things you post on any of your social media pages. If you think you may post anything that may get you into any trouble, you may want to avoid logging into your account until your divorce has been finalized.

Anything On Social Media Can Be Used Against You

If you are in a heated divorce, your husband or wife may be looking for anything that can make you look bad so he or she will receive everything they are looking for.

Since many people share a significant amount of information online, people who are divorcing will turn to social media for information they can use against one another. Social media postings cannot only impact spousal support and child support orders, but it can also impact a custodial agreement. 

If you are fighting for custody of your child or children, you should definitely avoid posting any photographs or videos that will show you using illegal drugs, drinking alcohol, fighting, partying, etc. 

If you tell the judge you cannot make spousal or child support payments, but you are posting photos of your money, posting photos of expensive merchandise, or posting vacations pictures, your spouse can use those photographs or videos against you to prove that you can indeed make those payments. 

We understand that divorces can get heated and difficult, but social media can get you into more trouble than you think. If you are going through a divorce, do not hesitate to contact us for information on how social media can impact your divorce. 

Do Not Let Emotions Interfere With Property Division and More During a Divorce

Thursday, March 24, 2016

The divorce process can be time-consuming and costly in addition to emotionally draining, which is all why it is easy to make mistakes when dissolving a marriage. Consider these tips when wanting to minimize financial expenses.

Focus on the important things:

Some people think divorce is the proper time to get revenge or air grievances, but this only draws out the process and makes it more expensive. It is important to try to act rationally instead of thinking with anger, grief or guilt. To get the best outcome from a divorce, you may need counseling or an attorney first.

Know when patience is necessary: 

Whether you are letting emotions get the best of you or dealing with a spouse who is, waiting out drama is often necessary to avoid regrets later. Trying to rush a divorce or giving in out of exhaustion will only result in an unsatisfactory settlement on your part. If there is an issue of contention or spouses have trouble communicating, alternate forms of divorce like negotiation or mediation might help.

Try to work together: 

Emotions do not always have to get the better of those going through a divorce. To resolve a divorce in a timely matter, both partners typically need to communicate honestly and be open to compromise. It may help if you have a few priorities in regards to matters like property division, alimony or child custody as this lets you focus on what you find most valuable while making concessions with less important items.

An attorney could offer a more objective point of view and help one negotiate and reach an agreeable settlement, so contact us when going through a divorce.


How to Manage Anger during a Divorce

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Anger can be a powerful emotion, but during a divorce, its effects are very often detrimental to your interests. It is however, one of the most common emotions that people feel, and it is likely that you will struggle with these feelings during your divorce.

Understand that anger is a natural part of the grieving process during a divorce. Try not to stifle it. Failing to deal with your feelings can only increase the risk of depression, and anxiety.

It's normal for you to feel angry at this point in time, so don't fight it. It is important to not let anger consume you, and color your decision-making. Some of the worst decisions made during the divorce are those that are made while angry.

Try to find safe ways of venting your anger. Writing down your thoughts in a journal is good way of doing so. If you can find a close friend in whom you can confide, do so. However, don't take to social media to vent against your soon-to-be ex-spouse. This is one of the worst things that you can do while angry, and could possibly wreck your divorce case.

Get regular physical exercise. Being physically active can help you vent some of your frustrations in a healthy manner. Join an aerobics club, enroll in kickboxing, or martial arts class, and look for activities that help you deal with unexpressed anger.

Don't worry about keeping up a perfect façade. You may want people to believe that the divorce is not affecting you at all, and that you're taking it all in your stride, while seething inside. This is an unhealthy attitude to have. Letting people know that you are feeling the way you do can help you manage anger in a healthy manner.