Family Law Blog

How Long Does Rehabilitative Alimony Last?

Friday, July 27, 2018

There are many different types of alimony that may be used depending on the specifics of a divorce. However, most commonly, if you are going through a divorce, you may find yourself paying or receiving what is referred to as rehabilitative alimony or spousal support. Unlike permanent alimony, you may find yourself paying or receiving this for only a set period of time.

Rehabilitative spousal support is meant to not be permanent, but to "rehabilitate" a spouse so they can become self-sufficient after a divorce. However, as to how long it can last will vary. Sometimes, the courts can decide that it should be paid only for a set amount of time so the spouse can get back on their feet. However, rehabilitative alimony can also be tied to a specific goal such as graduating college or gaining sufficient employment.

Yet, if rehabilitative alimony is tied to a specific goal, it leaves room for a spouse to abuse that. They could take a year off their education or only take one class. If there is not a sufficient reason for this, you may be able to argue that you should no longer pay spousal support. Often in these cases, an ex-spouse will get a job and not have time for education, or not want to pursue it at all anymore. Usually, the rules for rehabilitative alimony can then be altered or dismissed depending on how much an ex-spouse is making at their new job or changing the rehabilitative alimony from "goal-based" to a set time limit.

While no one really wants to pay spousal support, doing so on a rehabilitative basis can often be preferable purely because it is not forever and they only need to pay for a set amount of time. If you are going through a divorce and want to make sure you are not paying spousal support forever, then contact us today.