Family Law Blog

Religious Conservatism Contributes to Higher Divorce Risks

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Traditionally, religion has been found to act as a buffer for divorce risks because most religions tend to discourage divorce and encourage spouses to stay together. However, in many of those states that are very heavily religious, like Southern States, divorce rates are actually much higher than they are in the liberal states, like California and Massachusetts. For years, researchers have believed that the harder socio-economic conditions in the southern states possibly contribute to a higher risk of divorce for people who live in these states. However, research sheds new light on the matter.

According to a study that will soon be published in the American Journal of Sociology, persons living in so-called “red” states that are traditionally conservative by nature, seem to have higher divorce rates. What is surprising is that you don't necessarily have to be hard-core religious to have a higher divorce risk in these red states. Even non-religious people here seem to be at a higher risk for divorce.

According to the research, the answer to this mystery lies in the fact that such religious conservatism often forces young people to get married early. Many young persons in these societies are pressured to get married early, through lack of access to emergency contraception, a focus on abstinence, and frowning upon premarital relations. Even nonreligious people may feel the pressure to get married quickly, because the most desirable catches disappear quickly from the market.

In such situations, younger people may end up getting married much before they are psychologically prepared for the huge life change that marriage is. At this age, they may not be ready to shoulder the responsibilities of married life as well as children in the family.

Not surprisingly, many of them find themselves in a divorce court just a few years down the line. It is this pressure on young persons to get married quickly, that could be at the core of the higher divorce rates in the Bible belt.

Domestic Violence Rates Higher in Police Families

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

The rates of domestic violence, murder and suicide are higher among the families of those people who are entrusted with the responsibility of preventing such crimes in the general population. According to an analysis of data by researchers at the University of Utah, the rates of these offences, including domestic violence, were much higher among police families.

According to the researchers, over the past decade, they have been researching murder-suicide trends, and in the course of their research, they have analyzed as many as 730 murder-suicides across the country. In their analysis, the researchers found evidence of something called” suicide contagion,” in which a person who is considering suicide, believes that his family will be devastated by his suicide, and therefore, goes ahead and murders his other family members.

Many of these cases, according to the researchers, have family issues, like entangled or disturbed relationships, at the core of the issue. Usually, there is a spousal estrangement, divorce, separation or evidence or some other family law-related matter that is to be found at the root of such incidents. The researchers say that the number of incidents that their data analysis has thrown up does not even constitute the tip of the iceberg, and that there is much more data to be analyzed from around the country. They plan to continue their studies into such domestic violence and homicide risks in the police force across the country.

The researchers also believe that domestic violence rates are higher in police families, because officers very often do not know who to ask for help with a family-related problem, or believe that asking for help could be misconstrued as a sign of weakness. Society very often expects police officers to be robotic, in control of their emotions all the time and always on duty. People seem to forget that officers are human beings, and could be going through family issues at home that could affect their psychological state of mind.

Domestic Violence Linked to Higher Abortion Rates

Monday, January 13, 2014

According to the results of a new study, as many as a quarter of all women who end up having abortions, are victims of domestic violence. The study was conducted by researchers at Kings College London, and found that there is a possibly strong connection between abortion and domestic violence.

The research was based on the results of 74 studies that were conducted earlier on domestic violence. The earlier studies looked at a possible connection between all types of domestic violence, including physical, sexual, and psychological violence, and abortion rates.

The researchers estimate that worldwide, between 2% and 30% of women who had an abortion, were victims of domestic violence over the previous 12 months. They also estimate that between 14 % and 40% of women in the study who had abortions, were victims of domestic violence at some point in their lives. Overall, according to the research, an estimated 25% of all women worldwide who had abortions had experienced domestic violence.

The study stops short of actually giving a cause-and-effect link between domestic violence and abortion. However, it does raise sufficient questions about the long-term consequences of domestic violence.

If you are currently a victim of domestic violence, you are probably in the most traumatic and stressful period of your life. It is important to understand that you must get legal help for your own safety as well as the safety of others in your care. There are legal protections for victims of intimate partner violence in California, and you must access these protections in order to safeguard your family safety. Those protections include a domestic violence restraining order that can help protect you from violence by restricting your partner’s access to you.

Los Angeles Child Support Case Gets Tainted by Attempted Murder

Saturday, January 04, 2014

Continuing in a growing trend of child support, divorce and child custody cases gone terribly wrong, a Los Angeles father is being accused of trying to kill his ex-wife, during a particularly contentious child custody battle.

33-year-old William Wallace of Santa Ana was recently charged with attempted murder with premeditation, and solicitation to commit murder. According to the accusations against him, he tried to hire an undercover detective to kill his ex-wife.

According to the charges against Wallace, in August he hired a private investigator to discover unknown information about his ex-wife, so that he could use this information against her in a child custody/child support battle with her. However, during the course of their discussions, Wallace allegedly asked the investigator if he would be willing to refer someone who could kill his wife and then dispose of her body.

He later met with an undercover detective, and asked him if he was he could help him carry out the murder of his ex-wife. According to the charges against him, he told the detective that was willing to pay up to $30,000 for the murder. He even showed the detective a picture of his wife, so that she could be identified and killed.

Wallace seems to have believed that it would be much more financial advantageous for him to dispose of his ex-wife in this manner, than to continue to pay child support payment or to settle the dispute in an illegal manner.

For California divorce lawyers, it has been fairly troubling over the past few months to see a series of incidents, many of them in California, involving violence committed by spouses in the middle of a divorce or child custody battle. Divorce can be a traumatic and stressful event, and in such cases, it's recommended that the parties involved obtain psychological or emotional counseling to help deal with this major transition.